EVANSVILLE PHILHARMONIC BRINGS NEW TRADITIONS DIVERSITY SERIES TO TRI STATE HINDU TEMPLE & CULTRUAL CENTER

The Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra hosts their April Connect & Celebrate: NEW TRADITIONS diversity series at Tri State Hindu Temple & Cultural Center, located at 6044 S Vann Road, Newburgh, Indiana on Thursday, April 22, at 6:00 PM.

Members of the Eykamp String Quartet (Alan Snow, violin; Jia-Rong Gan, violin; Mark Hatlestad, viola; & Graham Cullen, cello) will play works by Reena Esmail and Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson. The performance will begin with a duet by Leanne Hampton, flute and Mark Hatlestad, viola playing Esmail’s Nadiya. The quartet will perform String Quartet No. 1 “Calvary” by Perkinson and Zeher (“Poison”) by Esmail.

Indian American composer Reena Esmail (b. 1983) works between the worlds of Indian and Western classical music and brings communities together through the creation of equitable musical spaces. Esmail is the Los Angeles Master Chorale’s 2020-2023 Swan Family Artist in Residence, and Seattle Symphony’s 2020-21 Composer-in-Residence. Previously, she was named a 2019 United States Artist Fellow in Music, and the 2019 Grand Prize Winner of the S & R Foundation’s Washington Award. She holds degrees in composition from The Juilliard School (BM’05) and the Yale School of Music (MM’11, MMA’14, DMA’18) and is currently an Artistic Director of Shastra, a non-profit organization that promotes cross-cultural music connecting music traditions of India and the West. She currently resides in Los Angeles, California.

Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson (b. June 14, 1932 - March 9, 2004, Chicago) was an innovative American composer whose interests spanned the worlds of jazz, dance, pop, film, television, and classical music.Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson was Afro-American. He was named after Afro-British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875–1912). His mother was active in music and the arts as a piano teacher, church organist, and director of a theater company. Perkinson cofounded the Symphony of the New World in New York in 1965 and later became its Music Director. He was also Music Director of Jerome Robbins's American Theater Lab and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. He wrote a great deal of classical music but was equally well-versed in jazz and popular music. He served briefly as pianist for drummer Max Roach’s quartet and wrote arrangements for Roach, Marvin Gaye, and Harry Belafonte. He also composed music for films.

Admission is free and open to the public. For more information, call (812) 425-5050, Ext 316